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Our Cover Polls


Want to have some fun?

Help us pick the cover designs for our new books. Read the books' descriptions below and click on the cover you like best.
Please limit your voting to one per person.


  • Fence Jumper

    by Mark J. Brandenburg

    James Ford, the philandering Secret Service agent suspended for his involvement in an international sex scandal, discovers Kat Sterling, the purportedly kidnapped and murdered wife of a senator running for the presidential nomination. The Washington socialite reveals her husband’s plan to have her killed to garner sympathetic media coverage for the widowed legislator in hopes of swaying the election in his favor. The world remains glued to their televisions awaiting the fate of the senator’s wife as she teams with the reckless, over-confidant federal agent to investigate the senator’s plot. The unlikely duo uncover a web of insider intrigue which involve conniving senators, murderous Russian assassins, and the subversive machinations of the Washington elite far deeper and sinister than they had imagined. Fence Jumper is a political thriller that turns the genre on its head as James and Kat attempt to thwart the designs of Washington leaders and foreign double-agents in a humorous story that mocks the current state of national politics which will appeal to fans of page-turning thrillers, political junkies, and anyone wanting a fun, unpredictable bit of escapism

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  • One with the Road

    by John Reger

    Most people never get to travel across the United States, least of all take three months to do it. In One with the Road, John Reger leaves Southern California on his Harley Davidson in a classic search for himself and America. Covering forty states and nearly 12,000 miles, the author meets unique and interesting people that share his iconoclastic lifestyle, such as a hitchhiking preacher, a truck-stop dentist, and a confidence man—all who teach him, and us, that being unusual makes life more interesting.

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  • No Gun Intended

    by Mario Rutledge

    No Gun Intended follows seventeen-year-old Ian Moss, who, after years of homeschooling, is encouraged by his mother and his therapist to attend his final year of high school in person to prepare him for college and adulthood. Though excited to embark on this new journey, Ian soon discovers the difficulty of trying to maintain his mental health as he deals with the politics and societal aspects of high school. And as a new millennium approaches and graduation nears, things take a dark turn for the worst once Ian shows up to school with an assault rifle. This offbeat work of fiction serves as a disturbing reminder of the reality society faces regarding gun violence and the role of mental health, as well as to provide an entertaining journey of adolescence through a fish-out-of-water experience.

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  • America: Underwater and Sinking

    by James B. Lockhart III

    Politicians’ polls are at an all-time low. Most Americans are frustrated with Washington. The country’s biggest program, Social Security, is only twelve years from insolvency, and two of the nation’s largest financial institutions, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are well into their second decade of conservatorships as wards of the state. In America: Underwater and Sinking, James B. Lockhart, a former submarine officer with the US Navy who went on to play a large part in the government’s response to the Global Financial Crisis, tells an important story about managing government agencies that—in submarine parlance—are deep underwater, then provides solutions on how to help them and the overall government surface. As President Geroge H. W. Bush once said, “There is nothing more fulfilling than to serve your country and your fellow citizens, and to do it well.” Underwater is about trying to do it well.

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  • Every Other Weekend

    by Anthony J. Mohr

    Anthony J. Mohr’s father, Gerald Mohr, is an actor known for playing Philip Marlowe on the radio, but he slips to the Hollywood B-list thanks to the advent of television. In a bid for the stardom he enjoyed on radio, he accepts the lead in a dying television series in Sweden, where he falls for the Swedish script girl and divorces Mohr’s mother. She meets another divorcee, Stanley Dashew, who helped pioneer the credit card industry and built the machines that embossed and imprinted the BankAmericard. They marry, and in the process, Mohr gains an older stepbrother and a younger stepsister who visits every other weekend. The author comes of age when divorce was rare and viewed as shocking. He tries to find his place between two wildly different fathers. He watches his stepfather's business career rise as his biological father’s career eases downward. One weekend he’s sailing on his stepfather's fifty-eight-foot catamaran. The next, he hears his father say, “Money's tight,” and his Swedish wife tells him that they’re poor. He lives at the edges of what others regard as a dream world, a place where reality and fantasy blend, maps lead to the homes of the stars, and obstacles abound.

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  • Carolina’s Ring

    by Lynn Seldon

    Carolina’s Ring is a modern coming-of-age story between three childhood friends who are forced to make difficult decisions that will impact their lives forever. With several unexpected life-and-death events that shape the lives of Carolina Stone and twin brothers, Ben and Alf Marshall, Carolina’s Ring moves from the foothills of South Carolina to the campuses of the Virginia Military Institute and The Citadel––and ultimately to the Global War on Terror in Iraq and beyond. Carolina’s Ring culminates with an unexpected destiny for Carolina and her beloved ring.

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  • See Jane Fly

    by Nicole S. Kluemper, PhD

    During a contested divorce, a precocious, curly-haired, five-year-old Nicole returns home from visiting her mother and recounts an incident which took place during the visit. This sparked a bitter court battle including accusations of sexual abuse, which ended with her father being awarded full custody of her. Twelve years later, Nicole asks the forensic evaluator to send her a copy of the video recordings he made as part of his assessment so many years ago. Although Nicole has since forgotten about any accusations of abuse, she seems to recall something similar to what she described back then just before viewing the videos of herself as a young child while once again being video recorded. This recalled memory turns Nicole into the subject of a morally questionable investigation by a memory researcher determined to find evidence to support her own agenda. While fighting to protect her legal right to privacy, Nicole proceeds to live out her father’s dream of becoming a Navy pilot, and follows through with her own childhood dream of becoming a psychologist as well

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  • Coconut and Charles

    by Ellena Aislynn Vollmer

    Welcome to the imagination of a bright eight-year-old little girl who loved animals and adventures. The wonderful writing came from a tenderhearted child who had five rescue pups of her own. Come join Coconut and Charles in their little pup adventures with their beloved adopter Brian. From playing fetch in the back yard to making new friends, they surely have a lot to enjoy in life. The message is about community, problem-solving, silly daily fun, and a surprise in one of the chapters to see if you are paying attention (*wink*). Highlights are also made over words to enhance your child’s vocabulary. Have a seat and get ready to enjoy the fun!

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  • A Boy, an Orphanage, a Cuban Refugee

    by Tony Dora

    Why would parents send their children, unescorted, to a foreign country with no guarantee that they would ever see each other again? From December 1960 to October 1962 (during the Missile Crisis), over 14,000 unescorted children fled Cuba for the United States in what became known as Operation Peter Pan. Under Fidel Castro’s tyrannical regime, the State confiscated people’s property and bank accounts. Food, clothing and medicine were rationed. Churches, houses of worship and the clergy were attacked. There was no freedom. Cubans lived in fear. Furthermore, communism was taught in schools and children were brainwashed to spy on their parents. A rumor that Castro was sending children to the Soviet Union to receive Marxist indoctrination and serve in work camps caused panic. When Tony and Norma boarded the plane that would fly them to freedom, they had no idea what the future would hold. Theirs was a voyage into the unknown. A Boy, an Orphanage, a Cuban Refugee chronicles their emotional journey through Tony’s eyes as he and Norma navigated life for six weeks in a refugee camp and a year in an orphanage until they were reunited with their mother.

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  • Steel Soldier

    by James J Messina with Chuck Messina

    My father, who was the most influential person in my life, passed away on March 20, 2008. As an intimate gift to his children, he wrote and illustrated his life story. In the end, it took him eight years to complete his autobiography, and I was so impressed with his storytelling and artistic talent that I reached out to a journalist who had an interest in regional history. Following an interview with my father, the local newspaper ran a two-page article chronicling his life growing up in West Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, and his time serving as a Marine in World War II. The journalist applauded his work as an enormous achievement, and an important part of history. He encouraged me to publish his story and share it with the public, which is something I had wanted to do for a long time. My dad however was not interested, and said it was merely a token of love for his children to remember him by. This is an American tale about a working-class man who lived an honest life, believed strongly in God, and fought for his country. He represents thousands of other hardworking Americans with untold stories of integrity and honor. It’s also a compelling story of survival that begins in a gritty Pennsylvania steel town during the Great Depression and then transports the reader into the steaming jungles of Guadalcanal, where a young Marine faces death in one of the most pivotal and bloodiest battles of World War II. Steel Soldier serves as a testament to the special man my dad was. It’s not a gripping mystery that concludes with a thrilling climax. Rather, it is a series of vignettes, with some entertaining moments of a bygone era, which have been compiled by a very talented storyteller. To look at him, you’d never guess this mild-mannered, unassuming, and kind man had once been a fierce warrior. As long as I live, I will always admire, respect, look up to, and honor my father and all the men and women who have fought for this country. He was loved by everyone who knew him, and to me he is a true American hero. Semper Fi Dad

    Please read the synopsis above and then CLICK on the cover you prefer. Thanks for helping us pick a cover.

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